Future of ISCAS

Future of ISCAS: Planning for the 75th Conference Anniversary

Wednesday, May 30th - 16:30

TIME: 16:30 – 18:00

LOCATION: Auditorium

MODERATOR: Gianluca Setti, Politecnico di Torino

“How do we see ISCAS evolving in the Future? How can the Conference better serve the CAS community?”

OVERVIEW:

Conferences have served the technical communities very well in the past decades as a forum for exchanging ideas and to publish timely content. They are however experiencing a profound transformation due to

  • Increase of the speed of publication for journals which are now competing (and most of the time beating) the corresponding sub-to-pub time for a conference
  • Decrease in value of the conference proceedings publications to achieve tenure and promotions (with the notable exceptions of the area of computer science)
  • Decrease of overall research funding (and increase in registration fee) which reduces the number of conferences that scientists can attend

How shall ISCAS evolve? Shall the publication of the proceedings stop and only a selections of papers shall appear in Journals? Shall the conference become a venue for meeting and networking? Shall this be done (mainly) remotely and not in person?

We will discuss some of these issues (an others) together and will try to determine a possible path to serve better our community.

1968 – Miami Beach, Florida, USA
1969 – San Francisco, California, USA
1970 – Atlanta, GA, USA
1971 – London, United Kindom
1972 – Los Angeles, California, USA
1973 – Toronto, Canada
1974 – San Francisco, California, USA
1975 – Boston, MA, USA
1976 – Munich, Germany
1977 – Phoenix, AZ, USA
1978 – New York City, NY, USA
1979 – Tokyo, Japan
1980 – Houston, Texas, USA
1981 – Chicago, Illinois, USA
1982 – Rome, Italy
1983 – Newport Beach, CA, USA
1984 – Montreal, QC, Canada
1985 – Kyoto, Japan
1986 – San Jose, CA, USA
1987 – Philadelphia, USA
1988 – Espoo, Finland
1989 – Portland, OR, USA
1990 – New Orleans, LA, USA
1991 – Singapore, Singapore
1992 – San Diego, CA, USA2011 – Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

1993 – Chicago, Illinois, USA
1994 – London, United Kindom
1995 – Seattle, WA, USA
1996 – Atlanta, GA, USA
1997 – Hong Kong, China
1998 – Monterey, CA, USA
1999 – Orlando, Florida, USA
2000 – Geneva, Switzerland
2001 – Sydney, NSW, Australia
2002 – Phoenix, AZ, USA
2003 – Bangkok, Thailand
2004 – Vancouver, BC, Canada
2005 – Kobe, Japan
2006 – Kos, Greece
2007 – New Orleans, LA, USA
2008 – Seattle, Washington, USA
2009 – Taipei, Taiwan
2010 – Paris, France
2011 – Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
2012 – Seoul, South Korea
2013 – Beijing, China
2014 – Melbourne, VIC, Australia
2015 – Lisbon, Portugal
2016 – Montreal, QC, Canada
2017 – Baltimore, MD, USA

Tanay Karnik

Intel Labs

Challenges with Realizing a Dream IOT System. Always ON, Always Sensing, Maintenance-Free Platforms

Abstract

Always ON always sensing small form factor edge systems for internet of things (IOT) are becoming ubiquitous. Many applications require these tiny devices to be self-powered and maintenance free. Hence they should be able to harvest energy from available ambient sources and should have low manufacturing cost. Millimeter-scale form factor systems have been developed in academia for the past few years. They are also becoming commercially available. IOT edge systems are essential in today’s cyber physical world. We will introduce the available market and the trends driving this growth in IOT system deployments. That will be followed by typical system requirements for a dream IOT system. We present the requirements for such systems and the challenges associated with realizing them. We add details of two IOT edge systems that followed two distinct system design approaches, namely, bottom-up and top-down.

Tanay Karnik

Intel Labs

Challenges with Realizing a Dream IOT System. Always ON, Always Sensing, Maintenance-Free Platforms

Abstract

Always ON always sensing small form factor edge systems for internet of things (IOT) are becoming ubiquitous. Many applications require these tiny devices to be self-powered and maintenance free. Hence they should be able to harvest energy from available ambient sources and should have low manufacturing cost. Millimeter-scale form factor systems have been developed in academia for the past few years. They are also becoming commercially available. IOT edge systems are essential in today’s cyber physical world. We will introduce the available market and the trends driving this growth in IOT system deployments. That will be followed by typical system requirements for a dream IOT system. We present the requirements for such systems and the challenges associated with realizing them. We add details of two IOT edge systems that followed two distinct system design approaches, namely, bottom-up and top-down.

Biography

Dr. Hendrik F. Hamann is currently a Senior Manager and Distinguished Researcher in the Physical Sciences Department at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY. He received his PhD from the University of Göttingen in Germany in 1995. After that, he joined JILA (Joint institute between the University of Colorado and NIST) as a Research Associate in Boulder, Colorado, where he developed novel near-field optical microscopes to study single molecules at high spatial resolution. In 1999 he joined IBM Research at the T.J. Watson Research Center, where he demonstrated for the first time magnetic recording via thermal near-field coupling. Since 2001 he is leading the Physical Analytics program in IBM Research, currently as a Senior Research Manager. Physical Analytics is a term, which IBM coined to describe the emerging field at the intersection of big IoT data, physical modeling and data analytics, which aims providing the underlying intelligence for future and smarter IoT applications (“cognitive IoT”). Between 2005 and 2009 he worked on energy and thermal management all the way from the device level to large scale computing systems. He invented a new technique to measure power distributions of chips under full operations. This method is today extensively used for IBM’s high performance microprocessor design. More recently Hamann’s main accomplishments are IBM’s Measurement and Management Technologies (MMT) for improving energy efficiency of data centers. Hamann’s current research interest includes sensor networks, sensor-based physical modeling, renewable energy, energy management, precision agriculture, system physics and big data technologies. Foremost he has been leading an effort to develop a platform for big spatio-temporal data and analytics. Since 2016 he is a senior manager in IBM Research leading the world-wide activities in IoT research.

Tanay Karnik

Intel Labs

Challenges with Realizing a Dream IOT System. Always ON, Always Sensing, Maintenance-Free Platforms

Abstract

Always ON always sensing small form factor edge systems for internet of things (IOT) are becoming ubiquitous. Many applications require these tiny devices to be self-powered and maintenance free. Hence they should be able to harvest energy from available ambient sources and should have low manufacturing cost. Millimeter-scale form factor systems have been developed in academia for the past few years. They are also becoming commercially available. IOT edge systems are essential in today’s cyber physical world. We will introduce the available market and the trends driving this growth in IOT system deployments. That will be followed by typical system requirements for a dream IOT system. We present the requirements for such systems and the challenges associated with realizing them. We add details of two IOT edge systems that followed two distinct system design approaches, namely, bottom-up and top-down.

Tanay Karnik

Intel Labs

Challenges with Realizing a Dream IOT System. Always ON, Always Sensing, Maintenance-Free Platforms

Abstract

Always ON always sensing small form factor edge systems for internet of things (IOT) are becoming ubiquitous. Many applications require these tiny devices to be self-powered and maintenance free. Hence they should be able to harvest energy from available ambient sources and should have low manufacturing cost. Millimeter-scale form factor systems have been developed in academia for the past few years. They are also becoming commercially available. IOT edge systems are essential in today’s cyber physical world. We will introduce the available market and the trends driving this growth in IOT system deployments. That will be followed by typical system requirements for a dream IOT system. We present the requirements for such systems and the challenges associated with realizing them. We add details of two IOT edge systems that followed two distinct system design approaches, namely, bottom-up and top-down.

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