Tutorial FD2

Introduction to Machine Learning and Inference for Circuit and System Designers

Boris Murmann, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
Naveen Verma, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey
Vivienne Sze, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Abstract: Machine learning and inference techniques are become increasingly important for a wide range of applications, and must be supported in platforms ranging from cloud servers, cars, and robots to small portable devices and IoT sensors. Common to this plethora of systems is an unmet need for ever-increasing compute efficiency at all levels of complexity. The goal of this tutorial is to provide an entry point for circuit and system designers into this exciting and fast-paced area of research and development. Much of the presented material will emphasize machine-learning fundamentals that are critical both for understanding the properties of modern algorithms and the advances that are being pursued to extend them. This is followed by a hardware-centric exploration of non-deep learning approaches, followed by small-scale deep networks, and larger scale deep network processors. Examples of state-of-the-art CMOS implementations will be discussed throughout. As a final topic, the tutorial will deliver an introduction to tools and datasets that are widely used in the design of machine learning systems, to promote immediate engagement in the field.

Biographies

Boris Murmann

He is a Professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. He joined Stanford in 2004 after completing his Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering at the University of California, Berkeley in 2003. From 1994 to 1997, he was with Neutron Microelectronics, Germany, where he developed low-power and smart-power ASICs in automotive CMOS technology. Since 2004, he has worked as a consultant with numerous Silicon Valley companies. Dr. Murmann’s research interests are in mixed-signal integrated circuit design, with special emphasis on sensor interfaces, data converters and custom circuits for embedded machine learning. In 2008, he was a co-recipient of the Best Student Paper Award at the VLSI Circuits Symposium and a recipient of the Best Invited Paper Award at the IEEE Custom Integrated Circuits Conference (CICC). He received the Agilent Early Career Professor Award in 2009 and the Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Research Award in 2012. He has served as an Associate Editor of the IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, an AdCom member and Distinguished Lecturer of the IEEE Solid-State Circuits Society, as well as the Data Converter Subcommittee Chair and the Technical Program Chair of the IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC). He is the founding faculty co-director of the Stanford SystemX Alliance and the faculty director of Stanford’s System Prototyping Facility (SPF). He is a Fellow of the IEEE.

Naveen Verma

He received the B.A.Sc. degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the UBC, Vancouver, Canada in 2003, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from MIT in 2005 and 2009 respectively. Since July 2009 he has been with the Department of Electrical Engineering at Princeton University, where he is currently an Associate Professor. His research focuses on advanced sensing systems, exploring how systems for learning, inference, and action planning can be enhanced by algorithms that exploit new sensing and computing technologies. This includes research on large-area, flexible sensors, energy-efficient statistical-computing architectures and circuits, and machine-learning and statistical-signal-processing algorithms. Prof. Verma has served as a Distinguished Lecturer of the IEEE Solid-State Circuits Society, and currently serves on the technical program committees for ISSCC, VLSI Symp., DATE, and IEEE Signal-Processing Society (DISPS). Prof. Verma is recipient or co-recipient of the 2006 DAC/ISSCC Student Design Contest Award, 2008 ISSCC Jack Kilby Paper Award, 2012 Alfred Rheinstein Junior Faculty Award, 2013 NSF CAREER Award, 2013 Intel Early Career Award, 2013 Walter C. Johnson Prize for Teaching Excellence, 2013 VLSI Symp. Best Student Paper Award, 2014 AFOSR Young Award, 2015 Princeton Engineering Council Excellence in Teaching Award, and 2015 IEEE Trans. CPMT Best Paper Award.

Vivienne Sze

Vivienne Sze is an Associate Professor at MIT in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department.  Her research interests include energy-aware signal processing algorithms, and low-power circuit and system design for portable multimedia applications, including computer vision, deep learning, autonomous navigation, and video process/coding. Prior to joining MIT, she was a Member of Technical Staff in the R&D Center at TI, where she designed low-power algorithms and architectures for video coding. She also represented TI in the JCT-VC committee of ITU-T and ISO/IEC standards body during the development of High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC), which received a Primetime Emmy Engineering Award.  She is a co-editor of the book entitled “High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC): Algorithms and Architectures” (Springer, 2014). Prof. Sze received the B.A.Sc. degree from the University of Toronto in 2004, and the S.M. and Ph.D. degree from MIT in 2006 and 2010, respectively. In 2011, she received the Jin-Au Kong Outstanding Doctoral Thesis Prize in Electrical Engineering at MIT.  She is a recipient of the 2017 Qualcomm Faculty Award, the 2016 Google Faculty Research Award, the 2016 AFOSR Young Investigator Research Program (YIP) Award, the 2016 3M Non-Tenured Faculty Award, the 2014 DARPA Young Faculty Award, the 2007 DAC/ISSCC Student Design Contest Award, and a co-recipient of the 2016 IEEE Micro Top Picks Award and the 2008 A-SSCC Outstanding Design Award.

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